Kill Blocky Resumes! | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter gives you some No BS Resume Advice by encouraging you to think of the reader when you write your resume.

 

Read a Summary of Key Points

I'm back today with more no BS resume advice to help you develop a better resume, one that is going to get you more results.

I'm sorry I have to do this podcast because some of you just don't get the point. Most of you get right, but a large number of you make a huge mistake that is incredibly annoying.

You write your resume and share it in small print, in ugly fonts, and enormous blocks that are completely unreadable. Understand, all of us who read resumes are reading lots of them. The statistics are that we make decisions, and 6 seconds. Do you know what I do when I get a blocky resume? I hit the delete key. I know a lot of other people do as well.

The reason is that you haven't made it easy for me to find the experience that you have that is relevant to my clients. Do you think I'm going to sit there and read every word that you have written in that 6 or 8 point font in F-15 wine paragraph that you have written to find what I'm looking for?

No. You are supposed to accommodate me. You are supposed to accommodate the HR people in an organization, the hiring managers in an organization and make it easy.

What you should be doing your resume and is a comfortable sized font. I personally like 12; some people like 10. Take a look at it.

I have preference for certain phones but I get surprised sometimes by other fonts. I'm not going to make a font recommendation. I am again going to recommend a font that is sized at 10 or 12; I also recommend judicious use of white space. You don't want to have your text go all the way out to the left side or all the way out to the right side. You want to be able to keep your text so that it has adequate whitespace so that it is easily viewable.

What is the easiest way to know whether it has adequate white space? After you have written a resume and have printed it out,, folded in thirds. Hand it to someone and say, "tell me the 1st thing your high lands on when you look at this."

Time then for 6 seconds. Then, from there, turn it over to the next 3rd. Do the same thing.

Then, ask yourself, are these the points that you want the reader to really notice about? If not, you need to rework the resume so that the things that are really of value in the background that you want to be recognized for our easily visible to the reader. Without that, all you doing is throwing a bunch of stuff out there without consideration for the reader.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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3 Tips About Resumes – Job Search Radio

Whether you are a student or an old hand at job hunting, here are a few reminders you can use when writing your resume.

Read a Summary of Key Points

Resumes. Can’t live with them. Can’t live without them. I have done a lot of videos about writing resumes but I want to offer a few basic points that would coalesce some of those ideas.

Never ever use a template. Templates make you look ordinary; it cheapens the look of the document. Follow the format but you don’t actually want to use one. One reason not to use a template is because, if you’re going to submit a resume through an applicant tracking system, some have trouble parsing fields in templates. It also becomes more difficult for third-party recruiters to do editing.

“What do you mean? Why can’t they just do copy and paste?”

It’s because the frames that certain fields are put into make it hard to do that. In addition, you’re also asking people to waste time they don’t really have.

So, ditch the templates.

Next, instead of listing, “Objectives,” just know that no one really cares and if you want them to care, put it into your cover email (you don’t send a cover letter as a separate attachment. You put it into the message area of an email). You use that to talk about some of the things you are looking for in a job.

If you are used to using objectives, replace it with, “Summary.” Make sure the summary is keyword rich, specifically with the right keywords for the type of role that you perform and the kind of successes that you’ve had. Again, when people are looking for resumes on job boards, when they are searching for them in applicant tracking systems or on LinkedIn if they are trying to find you, they are searching by keywords. They are not simply scrolling through resumes.

When writing your resume, don’t just simply focus on your responsibilities, focus on responsibilities AND results that you have gotten, quantified by money saved were money earned.

These are a few the small changes I want to encourage you to make to your resume. So, to summarize:

1. Get rid of templates

2. Replace objectives with keyword rich  summaries

3. Spent time on responsibilities and results, the impact of what you did, quantified by money saved and money earned.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn