When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

Before listening, answer the question for yourself and then learn the best way.

Read a Summary of Key Points

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

 

 

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Should I Respond to an InMail About a Job I Am Not Interested In? – Job Search Radio

If you are a LinkedIn member (you are a LinkedIn member), you probably get regular inMails from recruiters asking whether you might be interested in a job that they are trying to fill. Should you take the time to respond?

That’s the question for today; I hope this solves the dilemma for you.

Read a Summary of Key Points

Should I respond to an InMail from a recruiter? The short answer is yes but let me explain why.

The recruiter reached out to propose a situation to you. You are not interested. That’s okay. But your goal is to create a relationship with people who might be able to help you. A polite response that says, “Thanks, but no thanks,” or, “Thanks but I’m not looking right now,” or, “Thanks but I don’t know anyone will be qualified right now. Stay in touch,” or, “thanks. I’m not interested”… Whatever it is, a quick note of response starts the opportunity for building a relationship.

Why do you want to build a relationship? So that this person feels like they want to reach out to you again. Before you start groaning, “Why would I want to talk to a recruiter,” because they have job opportunities that may help you in a certain time of your life and career. If you are arriving “cold,” they may not really know you well enough to recommend you to one of the better clients. That’s reason number one.

Reason number two is kindness. LinkedIn charges them if you do not respond to an inMail in 90 days. They deduct inMail’s from the recruiter’s account if you respond to it within 90 days of it being sent to you.

You should be on daily and, if not daily, every second day at a minimum. Check your inbox for messages, as well as doing a number of things on LinkedIn to market and promote yourself.

After all, if you just lurch from job search to job search when you are in desperate need of finding a new position, you are not doing the work of career planning or career management. You will just be getting out there and looking for a job each time you need one and it takes a long time to build things up in order to get results.

So, I am encouraging you, respond, answer, quick things. It doesn’t have to be a big long production. You will benefit by the relationship building and they have the second benefit of having the inMail credited back to them.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn