Templates?

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On this short show, Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from using resume templates.

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I want to talk with you today about resume templates.

1st of all, there are millions of them all over the web and, frankly, don't use them. I'm just gonna make it that simple. Don't use them. Here's why.

1. You have to comply with your format.. Yes, you can shop for lots of different formats... Do you really want to take the time?

2. The issue isn't necessarily the template or the format; the issue is the content that you're putting in.. You may say is attractive and presents very nicely, but can cause problems for the reader. Here's how. All of us whether we are a corporation or a recruiting firm, are using applicant tracking systems. We are looking to parse data into our systems. We are not manually re-keying things. We don't want to copy and paste your resume into our system. No matter whether corporate or third-party, all of our software are parsing resumes into fields that work properly. A lot of the templates have embedded headers. That can be a problem because a lot of parsing software has trouble reading embedded headers. We then have to manually re-key. At that point, you are a pain in the ass.

3. Sometimes people are cognizant of how the text is fitting into the template. Thus, at times I see resumes where information is cut off midfield or midsentence because a person didn't pay attention to the fact that the text that they have written for the resume didn't fit into the field that was assigned by the template. As a result, it scrolls out of you. See you always have to look at it.

The real issue though is about parsing. You need to ensure that your resume is "parsable" by all of us were receiving. For big companies, the issue for them is around government reporting. They're going to delete your resume if it doesn't parse properly.

If you're submitting a template you can have problems associated with it that you are not conscious of, but are impacted by.

Also, don't send your resume directly to employers. There are a lot of reasons for that that I covered in some of my videos. If you're sending it to recruiting firm, you don't want to be a problem resume for them; you just want to give them great information and frankly, most of the templates don't even look that good.

You can copy the look of the template. That's fine. But don't actually use one.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Regularly Update Your Resume

Ep 270 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it is important to regularly update your resume.

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I know all of you have heard me say the person gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest… Although those are great qualities to have. People get ahead by being alert opportunity. Sometimes those are internal to the organization. More often than not, they are external.

You may be looking for a job now, but I'm planting the seed with you. The seed is that once you get this job, you need to update your resume. Every 3 or 4 months. Why? Because you're going to be getting in males through LinkedIn, you're going to hear about jobs through friends, networking has been afforded an opportunity that you will hear about stuff that you are not "applying for." Firms will want to get a resume from you and you are not ready.

In addition, by updating your resume regularly, when it comes to review time you be well prepared with the best information about yourself, especially in those frequent circumstances where your boss has left midcycle, you have a new person in the are evaluating you, they don't know everything about you and what you've accomplished and instead of freaking out, you have an opportunity to be ready by having this old document.

Yeah, you think you can do this right before the review. Want to be more thorough if you do it every 3 or 4 months?

All I'm talking about is adding some bullet points to your resume. Every 3, maybe 4 months tops. 3 times a year or 4 times a year in order to make sure your resume is up to date.

This way, if an opportunity presents itself to you, you are ready to act.

You may think that when you get the email or inMail or request, you have time to write it then. Sure. Like that recruiter is sitting there waiting for you and they are now reaching out to a whole bunch of other people. Like all the other recruiters that that client has engaged are just waiting for your resume submission from the 1st recruiter while all the others are saying, "Oh, gee! It's Jane were competing with. I give up." Of course not. They are trying to fill. This job is much as the recruiter has who contacted you.

So, update your resume regularly. It will allow you to act quickly when opportunities present themselves..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

Infographic Resumes

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4:46

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses submitting an infographic resume when you submit your stay in standard one.

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I want to talk with you today about a type of resume that I think is a good supplement to the current one. It's called an info graphic resume. The idea of an info graphic resume is creating a visual depiction of what you do.

I don't consider that a good substitute for an actual resume, but I think it's a way that you can complement your resume in a way that will be quite striking.

Although many of you may think that you are not in a field that would respond well to that, because I'm not in a graphical field, baloney! I don't care for a recount to an engineer, a programmer or working retail, there is a way that you can use an info graphic resume to really highlight your skills and stand out from your competition.

Again, what you do is send the standard resume, but you might use the info graphic in the body of your email or send it as a separate attachment. You could put it on your LinkedIn profile in a way that it demonstrates many of the things that you do. After all, LinkedIn profiles are very flat and this is a way that you can show people more of what you do and how you do it. How you have created affect and successes.

How do you create an info graphic resume? Their software online that is available that will allow you to do it. Do a Google or Bing search for info graphic resume maker. You will see different products that are available, suggestions about how to make one. Look into adding an info graphic to your skill set as a way of complementing the traditional resume.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Beware of Resume Formatting Self-Sabotage

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a resume formatting mistake too many job hunters make.

 

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You know how there are different versions of Microsoft Word and Acrobat and if there are things that display differently in different versions of the software. Yet individuals insist on laying out that the resumes continued on the next page. And, when you're looking at it in a different version of word or Acrobat that was originally designed in, is in the wrong spot of the page.

For example, I was just speaking with someone and working with his resume, when I noticed that page 2 of 3 was listed about 1/3 of the way down on page 2, and page 3 of 3 was listed about half of the way down on page 3. Obviously, it doesn't look well I know it wasn't your intention.

Yes you can think to yourself, "Well, they will understand," but you put so much time and effort into your resume to give them 1/2 fast presentation of it. That wasn't what you set out to do. Don't sell.

Rather than do that, just avoid it. Avoid it altogether.

Avoid doing page numbering on your resume.

Someone else this morning send a resume that said, "Experience (continued." I know it was supposed to be at the top of the page, but instead it went up being about halfway down the page.

Avoid these sort of notations about where a continuation supposed to be in the document. They just don't work.

 

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Using Links to Stand Out

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses adding links to your resume.

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Over the course of time, most resumes are pretty obvious and predictable.

There's one thing that you can do is include URLs to other places where you have a web presence.. Whether that is LinkedIn, Twitter, Github, stack overflow... Whatever the site is will you have a web presence (and a good web presence, obviously), it serves you well because it gives you an opportunity to distinguish yourself from the people that you are competing with.

You can show samples of your work there. For example, creative people can take people to another site where they have a portfolio. If you're an IT person and have developed code is available for download, there's an opportunity to take people to a page where it is available through that link.

Don't just simply stick to her resume. Include a link to the sort of things that will allow an employer to get a richer view of you and your capabilities and you will stand out from the people you are competing with regularly.

 

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Stupid resume mistakes

Another Stupid Resume Mistake

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another stupid resume mistake. What would his Mother say? :-)

 

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Here's another 1 of those stupid resume mistakes that people make. They think they're fooling someone. But, as my mother used to say, "The only person you are fooling is yourself."

Here's the mistake.

You have a resume that says 2010 - 2013 and where you work. Then it says 2014 to present or 2013 to present.

Right off the bat, both corporate and third-party recruiters believe that you are trying to pull the wool over their eyes. No one likes that. If your hiring manager and you see resumes like that, your 1st reaction is, "How long were the out of work?" Right?

Why do you thing it's any different when it is you that is involved?

But the months in. It is going to come out, it's not like you are fooling anyone. Just put the months in your resume along with the year, let's get right out on the table.

If it is going to be an issue for someone on the resume, I can assure you that it is going to be an issue for them in person. They're going to go through the dates before they go through anything else, just to find out what you have been lying about or withholding from them.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Resume Mistakes | Job Search Radio

Ep. 224 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses another stupid resume mistake that too many job hunters commit.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Kill Blocky Resumes! | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter gives you some No BS Resume Advice by encouraging you to think of the reader when you write your resume.

 

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I'm back today with more no BS resume advice to help you develop a better resume, one that is going to get you more results.

I'm sorry I have to do this podcast because some of you just don't get the point. Most of you get right, but a large number of you make a huge mistake that is incredibly annoying.

You write your resume and share it in small print, in ugly fonts, and enormous blocks that are completely unreadable. Understand, all of us who read resumes are reading lots of them. The statistics are that we make decisions, and 6 seconds. Do you know what I do when I get a blocky resume? I hit the delete key. I know a lot of other people do as well.

The reason is that you haven't made it easy for me to find the experience that you have that is relevant to my clients. Do you think I'm going to sit there and read every word that you have written in that 6 or 8 point font in F-15 wine paragraph that you have written to find what I'm looking for?

No. You are supposed to accommodate me. You are supposed to accommodate the HR people in an organization, the hiring managers in an organization and make it easy.

What you should be doing your resume and is a comfortable sized font. I personally like 12; some people like 10. Take a look at it.

I have preference for certain phones but I get surprised sometimes by other fonts. I'm not going to make a font recommendation. I am again going to recommend a font that is sized at 10 or 12; I also recommend judicious use of white space. You don't want to have your text go all the way out to the left side or all the way out to the right side. You want to be able to keep your text so that it has adequate whitespace so that it is easily viewable.

What is the easiest way to know whether it has adequate white space? After you have written a resume and have printed it out,, folded in thirds. Hand it to someone and say, "tell me the 1st thing your high lands on when you look at this."

Time then for 6 seconds. Then, from there, turn it over to the next 3rd. Do the same thing.

Then, ask yourself, are these the points that you want the reader to really notice about? If not, you need to rework the resume so that the things that are really of value in the background that you want to be recognized for our easily visible to the reader. Without that, all you doing is throwing a bunch of stuff out there without consideration for the reader.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What Do Hiring Managers Think of Resumes with Quantified Accomplishments? | Job Search Radio

If my resume describes actions that “increased revenue by $1 million,” or “Increased productivity by 50%,” are hiring managers generally impressed, or do they assume the numbers are all made up? Do they want to see numbers like that?

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I was asked the question that I thought was terrific and I don't want to go through it with you.

What do managers think of resumes with quantified accomplishments. In my resume describes actions that increase revenue by $1 million or increase productivity by 50%, or hiring managers generally impressed or do they assume the numbers are all made up? Do they want to see numbers like that?"

I'm not going to go into the, "Do they want to see numbers like that," part of the question; I want to talk about what do managers think of the resume itself.

To know that, you have to understand that business is the language of numbers. Money. Money is a number. Thus, if you can help an organization make or save money, this is valuable. I want to hear that again.

Make or save money.

It is not just that you help the firm make $1 million, to use this example. It could be that you reduce costs by 23%. Hearing that number has an impact, right?

Are they impressed with. They just think that you made it up?

That is what the interview is going to determine. Understand that you can throw a number around, but unless you can back it up, you are going to get chopped up like you are put into a Cuisinart. I'll simply say that, yes, they like to see numbers because, otherwise, you are just reciting tasks without discussing impact of your actions.

"I was responsible for such and such." Great. What did that do? How did it impact the firm that you work for?

Even if you work in a job that you consider "low level," there is a way that you can use numbers to your advantage. For example (I'm going to use a call center example, not because I think it's low level, but it's one that you can clearly understand), in a call center, there is a mean, for which people handle calls, right? Let's say the mean is that you handle 5 calls an hour and you handle 8, what you are able to talk about is that, over time, you handle 60% more calls than the average call center worker does a good firm. That gets peoples' attention. "60% more calls!"

You are responsible for a group of 27 that is responsible for (I'll use technology as an example), design, development and implementation of a system that helps generate $47 million for your firm. They notice that! It replaced a 12-year-old legacy system that clearly become obsolete and, in developing that system, we took advantage of… You get where I'm going with us? You layout what the story is and the result that you got. Otherwise, you're presenting yourself as a drone.

I am responsible for this. I do that. On and on and on… I am a task monkey. If you want to be seen as a task monkey, just talk about the task and not the result that the task delivered.

Yes, managers are impressed by it, but only if you can deliver the goods afterwards.

My answer the question is simple. Yes, included it. Don't avoid it. Unless of course you are making it up.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Do Firms Actually Care About Descriptive Keywords on a Resume? | Job Search Radio

“Words like “managed” or “assessed” or “oversaw.” Do these matter to them?” This is what a listener asked me recently. I hope you find my answer helpful.

 

[spp-transcrpt]

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!