Going Behind The Recruiter's Back

Going Behind the Recruiter’s Back

Ep 280 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you from going behind a recruiter’s back to contact the client directly.

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There are some recruiters that are terrific; there are many that aren't. The 1st and will remind you of his to not paint them all with the same brush. You have to evaluate and assess each person individually in much the same way as if you are being being evaluated, you want to be treated individually, not as part of one group of individuals who works in a particular company painted with the same broad brush stroke that someone else is. You want to be standing on your own. Why you expect recruiters to be any different than you. So the 1st thing is to evaluate and assess people individually.

One tip about working with recruiters... You have a recruiter who has scheduled you for an interview and you are not hearing back right away and you contact the client directly. WHY? This person has a relationship with the client. Yes, you haven't heard anything and it is very likely that they haven't heard anything. If they had good news, don't you think they would've told you already? Of course! See you call the client and that makes no sense.

Trust that there is good news they are going to leap all over and get in touch. If there is no news or bad news, there is a message and a lack of communication, be patient with them. There is no reason to contact the client directly; they are busy folks, too. Just because you are impatient don't make it their problem. Just simply reach out to the recruiter and send them an email or text and say, "Have you heard anything yet?"

If they say that they haven't, accepted at face value. Do you think you can bang on the client store and say, "I want to know what is going on," because that is how they take that phone call, you think anything good is going to come of that? It won't. All that you're going to be doing is going over the head of the recruiter and piss them off. It's going to make them less likely to represent you. I know you don't care about that but the fact of the matter is you should. Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have.

I want you to hear that again.

Recruiters have a pulse on the market that you will never have. You need them. You may not think you do. But you need them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Being Foolish with a Recruiter

Ep 281 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the foolish things people do when they are interviewed by a recruiter.

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It happened so often that I have to mention it..

I'm interviewing someone over the phone, and I'm asking questions about the work. Eventually I am asked something that translates into, "Didn't you read my resume?"

Well, don't you understand what a recruiter does? Recruiters pay to evaluate and assess people on behalf of their institutional customers. We may have read, skimmed or not read your resume. Anything is possible.. But what we are trying to do is get an idea of how well you will interview. How you present your ideas. How cogently you discuss them. Whether your voice sounds flat or animated.

Are you someone that we would risk putting in from the client, knowing that at the end of the day if you do a terrible job it affects our relationship with the firm. When we evaluate and assess, we want to know how you are telling your story.

Thus, when you ask that question, "Didn't you read my resume," you are showing that you are a moron. You are showing that you don't know how the system works. Although I encourage people to make the system work for them, think about it for 2nd. This person is going to be paid somewhere between $20,000 and $100,000 to refer you and you are being argumentative with them.. They have a point to doing everything that they do.

Why would you be confrontational? It makes no sense. Understand, again, they are being paid to evaluate and assess people and refer someone who is going to be hired by the client. They just want this to work like clockwork.

Act like a jerk, you show your jerk. Don't do it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Contingency vs. Retained Recruiters

Ep 262 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the difference between contingency recruiters and retained recruiters.

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There is a certain air around retained search. It is perceived to be superior than contingency. Let's just analyze the differences.

A contingency recruiter is hired by company to fill a position. A retained search firm is hired by a company to fill a position and is paid an amount to retain them to do the search, another piece to deliver resumes to them and screen them and were for them and another piece upon completion. The percentages are irrelevant. It is how the money is funded to the retained search firm that will differentiate it from the contingency.

The contingency recruiter is only paid upon successful completion of the search. Everything else that they do is done on a speculative basis. Why does the firm hire retained firm versus a contingency? It is to buy the dedicated effort. There is the perception that the talent working for the retained firm is superior to that working for the contingency firm. That isn't always the case, but let's just accept the marketing here.

How does that affect you? For most of you, it won't matter. For most of you, you will be in the sector that is handled by a contingency recruiting firm. Retained search firms will work at a higher level than the contingency firms will. It. That's really where the differentiation is. How they are paid doesn't matter to you. It is the nature of the jobs that they are asked to recruit for.

If you are a C suite executive, I professional who is running a line of business or is the president of the chairman of an organization, obviously, you know, retained search firms are aware that retained firms are where you need to be. You need to do things to position yourself to be noticed by the retained firms in order to get on their radar.

It's not like you decide to look for a job and you reach out to retained firms. It doesn't work that way. They want to be reaching out to you. So what you do is put yourself in the position to be noticed and found. For most of you, you are at the contingency search levels. You are working on staff level positions, middle management jobs, direct director level positions... Nothing at an executive level. Executive levels of the balliwick of the retained search firms.

When I used to be asked, "Are you working on this position on retainer," I would take retainers for some positions. I would recruit for the most positions I was involved with were contingency searches. As far as the job applicant is concerned, it doesn't really matter except in the context of the nature of the position and the nature of the relationship that the firm or the individual recruiter has with that firm. If there's a good relationship, then it really doesn't matter. If there is no relationship, obviously it does.

When all is said and done, most of you live in the land of the contingency recruiter and you have to learn to evaluate and assess them in much the same way as you would if you are hiring them tooth to fill a position.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

RECEIVE A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Don’t Blow Your First Chance with a Headhunter

EP 259 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the mistake many people at a manager level and above make when working with recruiters and suggests how to correct it. It isn’t what you think.

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I want to talk with you people who are the manager level and above about how you work with recruiters and about how you evaluate them as part of your job search. Many times what happens is your 1st opportunity to get connected with the recruiter occurs while you are trying to hire. How do you treat most of the people who reach you?

Lower than athlete's foot.

You treat them badly. You are abrupt. You toss them aside. You know what I'm talking about. You don't take the call, you send them to HR, have no conversation. You allow yourself to be buffered from having a relationship with them because you're too busy.

The problem with that is that comes the time that you are looking for a job, you don't really have a relationship with them. Or, if you have been abrupt, rude and dismissive to them, suddenly you try to contact them and go, "Hi! Remember me? I'm looking for a job! I know I treated you like athlete's foot when I was trying to hire but hey you can make money off of me now!"

At the end of the day, you've missed an opportunity. You missed an opportunity to learn about them and what their capabilities are from the process of hiring in order to figure out whether they are worth working with during the process of job hunting.

I want to remind you of this, even though you may be looking for work now, you are going to land, and when you land, you need to develop close relationships with third-party recruiters whether they are contingency or executive, it doesn't really matter. You need to develop close relationships with recruiters in order to ensure that the next time you need them as part of your job search, you understand what they're capable of, you understand your abilities and they will be effective for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”
Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

 

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Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

 

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

How to Negotiate Salary Through a Recruiter

How to Negotiate Salary Through a Recruiter | Job Search Radio

EP 225 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the dirty little secret of working with a recruiter and how to negotiate salary when you are being represented by one.

 

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Most of the time, I am a big advocate for working with a recruiter to find a position. Why? There are a few reasons. The relationship with the employer that greases the skids to help you get in the door for an interview. (2) the ease from your standpoint. After all, they handle all your scheduling, as well as all the peripheral nonsense and deflected from you where your inexperience can distract you from seeing the employer as they should be seen.

When it gets to salary to go, there is an interesting dynamic. The recruiter smells blood in the water. The blood being their fee. Their job is to close the deal. That's true whether it is a retained search firm or a contingency search firm. The retained firm will talk very nicely… They won't even address it. They will dismiss it as nonsense, but everyone is working to make living. This isn't social work. Ultimately, they are trying to close the hire and get the position filled, just like the contingency firm.

The tendency is to push and bully very nicely or very aggressively the candidate into taking what the employer offers. I wish it weren't true, but statistics tell me this. That's not the way I will worked when I was still in recruiting. I really did try to make a match on the money. But most recruiters don't. After all, at the end of the day, you are the one transaction and they are going to try to work with that employer for many years to come. As a result, their natural tendency is to try to squeeze you, rather than squeeze the employer.

When you are working through a recruiter, it is important, just like when you are negotiating with the employer directly to know what you will value us. Sometimes, your numbers may be wrong. You are talking to friends who may be shooting from the hip and don't really have any data. You need to know your data and understand that the data reflects a range.

For example, you are looking at a job that pays $130,000-$150,000. If euro lower paid individual. Let's say that is $60,000-$70,000. If you are higher paid, let us say $400,000-$425,000 per annum. It is only human nature to hear the top number. $70,000. $150,000. $425,000. People tend to focus in on that number and if you are offered a dime less, people freak out and think, "hey! I didn't get all the money! Why did they offer me less?"

At the end of the day, you want to be in the range and want to drive it up as much as possible. Thus, when you are working with a recruiter, you have to say things to him or to her along the lines of, "They have coming a touch low and I am frankly disappointed. I have other things going on that will come in at a better number than this. Why don't you circle back and see if they will improve."

They will try to probe more and, from their standpoint, the contingency recruiter is panicked and the retained recruiter… I am not going to project on them. I'm simply going to say that they will try to push a little bit harder on the employer to up the number.

Without that, you are basically going to be stuck with the recruiter, the headhunter, the search firm who is going to try to push you into that box of the number, rather than have them try to push back at the employer in a diplomatic way. As a result, you need to be prepared to walk away from the situation if you follow my advice. After all, they may say, "She's not going to take it." Or "He's not going to take it unless you want the money."

In the example of the senior execs, they may say, "I said from day one, $425 and they have come in at $415. I believe my value is 425 and the $10,000 difference. I'm going to make for them. I will make many times over the course of my work for them. If they don't see the value, then this isn't the right place for me." With that, you've thrown the gauntlet down to say, "I'm prepared to walk away unless they had my number."

8 times out of 10, they are going to hit the number. If they aren't, they are being foolish and you don't want to join the company that is populated with fools.

For the person looking at that job as salary between $130,000 and $150,000, where you 0 in on 150 and you are making 125K, you are probably not going to get the 150K.. But you have to push them up a little bit.

Again, you circle back to the recruiter (this is true of the $60,000-$70,000 position, too) and say to them, "They have come in a bit short. I've got other things going on. This is a market where I can land. I would prefer it being there, but if they don't value me sufficiently. Then I will be very happy this next place I'm talking to.

By doing this, you're going to force them to earn their check and their faith..

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What Do Recruiters Look For in a Resumé At First Glance? | Job Search Radio

Resumes are only looked at for a few seconds. What do people look for?

 

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The question for today is, "We have all heard the stories, how few seconds people take to look at a resume. What 2 people actually look for in those few seconds?"

The question is actually very easy to answer. When we're looking at a resume, we are not looking at a full document. After all, when you think about it, when you look at a document on your screen. How much of the page shows up? Two thirds? Three quarters? That is about it.

So we are looking at a document that within two thirds or three quarters of the page ideally should be able to demonstrate some version of fit for a role.

I want to backtrack because you have a message area of your email and most people open, or have displayed on the screen and are using Outlook and have an additional pain available to them.

In an email, you want to indicate the position you are applying for. Maybe there is a job code or a title in the position description. If it is just the title provide something more because there could be multiple positions for the same title.

Let's say you might write, "CPA to work in such and such department."

"A software engineer to do Java development."

Whatever it is, just put something additional and if there's a job code, including your message. From there, once the person opens the resume, they want to see within one page down (you know, you have the page down key on your keyboard) something, ANYTHING that might demonstrate a fit for the position.

I know that's what I do. I have gotten to the point where am looking at the screen it page down and make a decision. Looking at a different one. Not seeing anything. Delete.

If it is for an obscure skill, like I've done searches for technology that is obsolete called MAPICS, there are AS/400 people who send me their resume and the 1st thing I do is hit edit, find and look for the term MAPICS. I want to see how old it is.

The client is already said that they don't want to see some of you did 5 years ago. They want to see someone who is work out more recently.

So what I'm trying to do is to find the key term in the resume because MAPICS runs on AS/400 (so AS/400 is it assumes skill). I need to find the MAPICS when it was last use. And when it was last used.

If you think about the typical search writer position in mind because the persons told me they've applied for this particular role (let's say it's the C suite position in recruiting for now. In a mid Atlantic state). They want someone with banking background. The 1st thing I'm doing is looking to see what level this person is at and have they done it at a bank. They may be a CIO and I'm seeing whether they have worked for a bank. No banking experience?

I can do this kind of decision-making and 3 seconds. 3 seconds!

We are looking for something in the resume that causes us to go deeper. That 1st level screen is because we know that basic thing that the client is looking for. This can be a corporate recruiter doing it, as well. It can be the hiring manager who is defined in his or her own mind what it is they want someone to have in the way of experience and what the crux of the search comes down to.

Like in that example like I gave a minute ago, CIO. Bank. CIO? Not a bank. Delete. Or input into my system to contact at a later time when I have something suitable.

That's it. We are looking for the corndog of the jobs we understand to be to see if a person has, because, without it, we know our client isn't interested! Without it, the HR recruiter knows their internal client isn't going to be interested. So why waste time?

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What Is The Best Day & Time of Day to Email a Resume and Cover Letter to a Recruiter? | Job Search Radio

My answer probably isn’t what you expect but it is the best answer.

clockface

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When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

 

 

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The Recruiter Swindle | Job Search Radio

It seems so crass to describe it this way but if we spoke about someone swindling you out of $20000, $40000 or more, you would recognize it right away.

On today’s show, I explain how recruiters are swindling you every day.

 

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Every day, we read stories in one form or another about confidence games. You know, people who are swindled out of money by con men or con women. There are stories of psychics; stories of salesman, who slowly build up trust with their victim and swindled amount of large sums of money.  In the same practice is true with recruiters.  It's developed under the guise of developing relationship with you during your job search. But, in point of fact, it is a con game.

You see, most recruiters you talk with have no idea about what they're talking about and the relationship with your client is somewhat limited.  So yes, they are very senior people like me who actually do have relationships with clients, who do know how they think, we've been out socially with them… Were not perfect but were damn good.

Then, there are most of them who are relatively green or mid-career and they say a bunch of stuff.  Usually what happens is that you submit a resume to them, they call you and evaluate you and then they schedule you for an interview.  They start preparing you for that interview or they have a senior person in our office preparing for the interview.  What starts to happen over time is you are hearing what sounds like expertise but, in point of fact, is a canned script that this person has developed either mentally or written out for them, helping to prepare you for an interview.

It progresses to the 2nd interview or a 2nd firm that wants to talk with you.  You get to see them and measure them but their goal is not your goal.

Their goal is not to help you find a job per se.  It is to help you find a job where you are there for a period of time, they earn a large fee.  Most of them have no idea what they're talking about.  They have no relationship with the client. They are just saying a bunch of stuff that they have been trying to say.

That's how the swindle works.  Like regular con man or con women  who start small and build their way up. They get into your confidence, seduce you as you will into believing that they have greater expertise than they actually have.

The result is who gets hurt in all of this?  You.  That's because you let your guard down because you start believing that what they say is actually good because it worked. You got to the 2nd interview and devalued yourself in the process.  You get to the 3rd interview and they tell you some more stuff you follow the script and you get to the job offer and the offer is good.  They have been asking you questions to find out what salary will cause you to say yes to an offer, feeding it back to the corporate client so that when the offer comes out at that number, you squeal with excitement, "That's incredible!  I got the money I was looking for!"  It is all part of the swindle.

You are being swindled out of objectivity.  In doing so, you were seduced into believing that they have greater expertise and greater knowledge than they really have.  In this way, you take down the barrier between you and them, believe what they have to say because it has been working so far (devaluing yourself in the equation).  The result is when it comes time to get the job offer you go, "Hallelujah!"  Then you say yes.

That's the swindle.  That's how it works.  Your confidence is gained by small measures along the way that build up until finally they ask you for the whole enchilada.

You can't believe the swindle.  I want to push you back and wake you up to the fact that recruiters are not your ally.  They are corporation's ally, because those of the people that are paying them. If you join and stay on board for any length of time.

Don't buy the bull.  Get an ally that doesn't have a vested interest in which job you take.  My site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has curated the information I have developed and other people have developed in order to help you fine work more quickly.  And if you think I'm getting rich on $49.99 per month (it is actually less if you join quarterly or for 6 months), you are mistaken.

This is my site where I help job hunters and function as as your ally.  If you want to do one-on-one coaching with me, my pleasure!  I discount my coaching rates for you.  If you just want to ask me questions, great! I am happy to answer them online, do a quick call with you and will work together so that you get what you need in order to find work more quickly.

 

 

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Why Won’t a Recruiter Tell Me Who Their Client Is? | Job Search Radio

They want to meet with me to discuss the job and won’t tell me who their client is.

On this show, I discussed 3 reasons why recruiters won’t tell you the client this.

recruiter-sticking-tongue-out

Read a Summary of Key Points

Here’s a question I received:

“What does it mean when a recruiter won’t tell me the name of the company that they are representing?”

“They want to meet with me 1st before talking in detail about the job.”

I’m not going to talk about ethics here because, even though you may think it is unethical, it is actually a non-issue.  Here are the issues from a recruiters perspective:

1.  You may attempt to circumvent them before you have a chance to talk with them about the job.  By circumventing, you take the information you’ve been given and apply directly to the firm. They are out $20,000, $25,000 $30,000 $50,000, $75,000 $100,000 in fees, all because, frankly, there are some people out there (I’m not saying you) who are swine.  Who are awful contemptible people, you think it is smart to steal things from others and cheat them out of what they rightly deserve.

2.  Another issue is control.  The desire to meet with you is indicative of control.  They want to control the situation. They are between you and your client.  They want to see you 1st and assess you 1st before revealing anything further.  That is 1/2 step down from. “I won’t tell you anything because I’m afraid you will steal it from me.”  They want to meet with you and discuss it in person. After they have a chance to evaluate you.

3.  Another thing is, what’s in it for them?  Perhaps their client has a brand that is not a positive and they can speak with you in person excite you about the job and then reveal it is this firm that has a pretty bad reputation in the market area, but has a unique opportunity.

Those are a few reasons why recruiters do it.  There are many more but these are going to be the top 3 reasons why recruiters don’t reveal things.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!