Don’t Let Them Distract You

Ep 291 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discourages you not to pay attention to employer BS and keep your eye on the prize.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Play to Their Emotions, Too | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire AND he proves it, too.

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This is 1 of the hardest lessons to get but I can prove it to you. There is the lesson: it's not facts that always win the day. It is emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.

For those of you who smoke and those of you who are smokers,, factually, you know smoking isn't healthy for you,, right? You know, at some point that if you continue to smoke, where you going to put yourself in a situation where you will suffer a lot,, your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you.These are the facts. Yet millions of people, tens of millions of people continue to smoke. Why when that same lesson extend itself to a salary make a salary negotiation?

With a third-party recruiter or corporate recruiter, we spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job.. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that's. Were not committed persuade some of the take $20,000 less by dealing with their emotions. The likelihood of that is very slim. For most middle-management professionals.

However, you can entice them to join if your own offer is close to ideal by talking with them about their relationship with the manager.. This is true, particularly after the interview.. If the manager does things that cause candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is only stuff that works with startup firms,, let me correct you. This works with any organization.

The hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it, but because they are creating an image in the candidate's mind of being someone Who they will want to work for. Because they're fun, upbeat,, they are someone that they can learn a lot from while they are doing this job. You need to impress upon these hiring managers their contribution to the hire. That's because in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What’s the First Rule of Negotiating a Job Offer?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers you the first rule of negotiating your job offer.

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Today's salary negotiation advice comes out of American politics an autobiography I read many years ago from former Pres. Nixon.

Nixon was known as a tough negotiator. Whether that was true or not, I don't know, but he had that reputation. It is autobiography, he wrote about negotiating with representatives of the People's Republic of China on some deal. He said, "If you ever find yourself going into some kind of negotiation, if they want to negotiate about something, if they want you to compromise on something, they have to give you something back in return."

When a firm is offer you less money, a position title is not quite right, something less than what your expectations are, you have to get them to concede to something else. Let me restate that. You want them to concede to something else. You don't want to respond by simply saying, "But but but but but but but but but. This is that the money we were talking about. This is not in title we were talking about." You don't want to be whining in front of them. You just want to very simply say, "okay. If I accept less money what are you going to do for me? I see that you want me to take less to come on board, but what concession can you provide me with? Are you going to increase the review from one year to 6 months? I go to give me a salary roof you at that time? What can you do to make things better for me in this negotiation?"

Big companies are really limited. We live in litigious times. If they do something for one person they can be sued as advantaging one class of individuals over another. Let's say you are a heterosexual white male . There is a person who is not a heterosexual white male who isn't able to negotiate the same deal as you did. A lawyer gets in the middle of this and asks, "Why did you do it for this person and not for the other?"

Big companies are more hamstrung than smaller or midsize firms, but, regardless, you start by saying, "If I accept this with this title, with the salary, with these terms, these have been exactly what we've been talking about. What can you do for me? Can you give me an earlier salary review? Can you increase my vacation time? What can you do for me?"

Too many people make the mistake of not negotiating. You want to be negotiated, which includes asking them for concessions. Negotiation doesn't mean that you make all the concessions; negotiating means both sides make them. All

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Asking for More Money

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Five Question Salary Negotiation

The Five Question Salary Negotiation

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate your job offer with just five questions.

 

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Let's talk about negotiating salary. You've got the offer. Everything seems great but you want to do a bit more negotiating. Here is the 1st thing you do: if you feel comfortable about what is been proposed but you just want to increase a little bit, here's the idea.

You'll be asking a few questions but I don't want you doing it right away. I want you to say, "I'm thinking favorably. Can I come back to you in a day or so to have a couple of questions answered. I just want to make sure I do this 1 time so that were not going back and forth. He give me a day here to think about it and circle back to you?"

Think of it from the hiring manager's perspective. He or she thinks right away that you're going to be coming back about money. As a result, when you come back to them, the 1st question that you ask is NOT about money. It should be about anything BUT money.

Consider asking when you get into the 401(k). When you become eligible for benefits. Something softball that will cause them to relax a little bit and think for a 2nd, "Ah! This isn't going to be so tough!" Then, the next question is going to be about reporting relationships. Who are you going to report to? What are they like? If I'm reporting to you, who do you report to? Who do we service? Things along those lines.

The 3rd question is always a big one. You want to go to your most important question 3rd. I prefer you not deal with money here and keep that for a little bit later in the conversation. Here, you might ask about whatever your critical issue is. Maybe, is that you will be taking a trip and it is prescheduled and you want them to know about it in advance. Maybe it is about bonus eligibility... Whatever it is, covered 3rd.

Then, you circle back and asked him another softball question. Do I work on a Windows device or Mac? Isn't that a softball question?

Now, for the money question, you have been building up to this one, see would say something like, "You know, I've been really thinking favorably about this opportunity. Could you do a touch better on the offer?" Normally, they will do 1 of 2 things; they will either increase it by a few dollars. The 2nd thing they might say is, "This really is our top number." You'll be able to tell if it's true by the sincerity of their voice. Whether that is true or not. You'll be able to use your "acute BS detector" to determine if that is the case. The 3rd response is to say, "I will have to get back to you. Is that a deal breaker for you?"

You can say no or yes; that will be your choice. Ultimately, if this is a dealbreaker for you, he or she is going to work that much harder to get the number or or say, "Forget it." It is all over at that point.

Assuming that it is not a dealbreaker, tell them that at the point. You're interested in joining, other firms been talking about more money with you, you have another offer at that price point, could they do a touch better?

That's the theory behind what I call, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." That's 1 of my YouTube videos. Watch it. It is about 10 minutes in length, and I think it is very helpful.

But I wanted to stage salary negotiation for you here. Kudos to my friend Ellis Chase. He did this in a Forbes article very well. If you go to Forbes and search for Ellis Chase, he lays out this formula nicely,

 

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake

Another Salary Negotiation Mistake

Ep 244 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the salary negotiation mistake way too many people make in their dealings with recruiters.

 

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Let's talk today about a mistake job hunters make way too often in their interaction with recruiters. Let's say you have a conversation with the recruiter in person or by phone, Skype, whatever. You tell them how much you are looking for. Great.

You tell them how much you are making. Great.

Recruiters need to know this because clients, very simply, ask and if you can't give a straight answer, they start thinking that you are weird.

Rather than appearing weird to the client who is then not going to want to meet you, tell the recruiter how much you are earning and tell them how much you are looking for. That part is easy.

User starts breaking down way too often.

Sometimes, things happen in the course of the search where you change your thinking OR you think you can finesse the situation and lied to the recruiter, get in front of the client and tell them something completely different. WRONG!

Let's say that you are looking for $125,000 on a base plus bonus. You get in front of the client that you're looking for $135,000, $140,000, $150,000 on a base plus bonus. Suddenly, what happens? Normally, what will happen is the client will sit there for a moment, think to themselves, "What's wrong with this person?" Or "What's wrong with this recruiter?" You will hurt the recruiter (I know you don't care about that but you're not good to get hired anyway because they're not suddenly going to increase the price JUST FOR YOU.

Recruiters are given an idea of what a firm is willing to pay. You may learn your value is higher. Communicated to the recruiter and let them do the interaction with the client on your behalf. Don't just spring this rabbit out of your hat out of the blue in front of the client and think you are the best one to handle it. You have no relationship with this person. None whatsoever. The recruiter does. Let them handle it.

If the firm isn't willing to pay your higher price, they have a wastage your time. Haven't wasted their time, haven't wasted the recruiter's time.

Again, go back to recruiters. If you decide to up the ante. Be forthright. Don't just deal with it on the fly/off-the-cuff because, you figured, "hey! What the heck. Let's negotiate!" At the time that they are asking, there is no negotiation. Their 1st assessing you for what you know and whether it fits with what they are looking for. The negotiations come later.

So let the recruiter handle that. That's 1 of the things you're expecting them to do, right?

 

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​​

The First Rule of Salary Negotiation

The First Rule of Salary Negotiation

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the first rule of salary negotiation.

 

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Most people in the US, Westerners, not Asians, not some Europeans, not some people from the Middle East, but those who are US-born are so uncomfortable negotiating because it is not part of the culture. I listen to clients of mine sometimes talk about making lower offers to people of certain nationalities, knowing full well that they are going to negotiate, and then they will get to the price that they think is actually the right one for the person. The people from those nationalities just know how to negotiate and the firm, as a way of countering that, comes a little slow so that they can negotiate up.

For you who are US-born, who are not used to negotiating, you have to get over your apprehension of doing it. You have to get over that, "Ooooh. Negotiation. I don't like doing that." Well, let me give you perspective.

You read all those finance books the teacher how to save money and how to invest in things and then you don't negotiate on the house purchase? I don't think so. I think you always try to negotiate our house purchase. Why not negotiating your salary, too. After all, if you get them to increase the offer by $10,000 over where they initially made the offer, in 5 years time, assuming a modest salary increase annually, you are more than $50,000 ahead in gross pay. If you actually change jobs in 3 years for another $10,000, it's more than $75,000 more.

If all you did was get that $10,000 more once and change jobs again after 3 years, you would forget about $70,000? Really?

Here is the simple way to negotiate. The deck is stacked against you when you interview. For many of you, if you interview and they ask you about salary and respond by saying, "I don't want to tell you," or words that they can interpret that way, or say something like, "I think it's a little too early in the interview process to discuss what I'm making now, but I am looking for such and such," firms are going to be like barracuda and start chomping at you.

For most of you, I'm not talking about senior people here, but for most staff level individuals, even for many people in the manager level, you have just shot yourself in the foot in their mind.

Recognize that the deck is stacked against you.
1. You will have to answer the question. In answering it, you say, "I'm currently earning such and such, but I want to be absolutely clear with you. That's not the salary that I think is particularly relevant here. I've started to assess my value in the market and firms are telling me that I should be earning about such and such. That's more in line with what I am looking for, I would simply say that if this seems like the right opportunity for me, and it certainly seems that, and I look like the right person for you, I'm just going to encourage you to make the strongest offer because people are going to be coming in fairly soon with offers for me that I think will be quite appealing."

Say something that will demonstrate that the current number isn't particularly relevant,the others are assessing you to a certain level and that is more in line with what your thoughts are. If they are interested in you, they need to make the strongest offer because you are in the market right now where people are finding you attractive.

If they don't want to do that, that's fine. After all, you will have other choices. Remember, it's not just about getting one job offer, it's about getting 2 or 3 so the people are competing to get you.

When all is said and done, it starts off with understanding that you have to negotiate, you must negotiate, you must care about yourself and your finances enough to always be negotiating and recognizing the samples that they are boxing in. Thus, you want to be pushing open the sides of the box to breathe. That's because, if they think they've got you, trust me, they've got you.

If they are not sure, it's not like they're going to reject you. If you are qualified. If you are the best person, it is just making them uncomfortable that they have the right price to bring you on board.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community forThe First Rule of Salary Negotiation you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us

How to Negotiate Salary Through a Recruiter

How to Negotiate Salary Through a Recruiter | Job Search Radio

EP 225 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the dirty little secret of working with a recruiter and how to negotiate salary when you are being represented by one.

 

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Most of the time, I am a big advocate for working with a recruiter to find a position. Why? There are a few reasons. The relationship with the employer that greases the skids to help you get in the door for an interview. (2) the ease from your standpoint. After all, they handle all your scheduling, as well as all the peripheral nonsense and deflected from you where your inexperience can distract you from seeing the employer as they should be seen.

When it gets to salary to go, there is an interesting dynamic. The recruiter smells blood in the water. The blood being their fee. Their job is to close the deal. That's true whether it is a retained search firm or a contingency search firm. The retained firm will talk very nicely… They won't even address it. They will dismiss it as nonsense, but everyone is working to make living. This isn't social work. Ultimately, they are trying to close the hire and get the position filled, just like the contingency firm.

The tendency is to push and bully very nicely or very aggressively the candidate into taking what the employer offers. I wish it weren't true, but statistics tell me this. That's not the way I will worked when I was still in recruiting. I really did try to make a match on the money. But most recruiters don't. After all, at the end of the day, you are the one transaction and they are going to try to work with that employer for many years to come. As a result, their natural tendency is to try to squeeze you, rather than squeeze the employer.

When you are working through a recruiter, it is important, just like when you are negotiating with the employer directly to know what you will value us. Sometimes, your numbers may be wrong. You are talking to friends who may be shooting from the hip and don't really have any data. You need to know your data and understand that the data reflects a range.

For example, you are looking at a job that pays $130,000-$150,000. If euro lower paid individual. Let's say that is $60,000-$70,000. If you are higher paid, let us say $400,000-$425,000 per annum. It is only human nature to hear the top number. $70,000. $150,000. $425,000. People tend to focus in on that number and if you are offered a dime less, people freak out and think, "hey! I didn't get all the money! Why did they offer me less?"

At the end of the day, you want to be in the range and want to drive it up as much as possible. Thus, when you are working with a recruiter, you have to say things to him or to her along the lines of, "They have coming a touch low and I am frankly disappointed. I have other things going on that will come in at a better number than this. Why don't you circle back and see if they will improve."

They will try to probe more and, from their standpoint, the contingency recruiter is panicked and the retained recruiter… I am not going to project on them. I'm simply going to say that they will try to push a little bit harder on the employer to up the number.

Without that, you are basically going to be stuck with the recruiter, the headhunter, the search firm who is going to try to push you into that box of the number, rather than have them try to push back at the employer in a diplomatic way. As a result, you need to be prepared to walk away from the situation if you follow my advice. After all, they may say, "She's not going to take it." Or "He's not going to take it unless you want the money."

In the example of the senior execs, they may say, "I said from day one, $425 and they have come in at $415. I believe my value is 425 and the $10,000 difference. I'm going to make for them. I will make many times over the course of my work for them. If they don't see the value, then this isn't the right place for me." With that, you've thrown the gauntlet down to say, "I'm prepared to walk away unless they had my number."

8 times out of 10, they are going to hit the number. If they aren't, they are being foolish and you don't want to join the company that is populated with fools.

For the person looking at that job as salary between $130,000 and $150,000, where you 0 in on 150 and you are making 125K, you are probably not going to get the 150K.. But you have to push them up a little bit.

Again, you circle back to the recruiter (this is true of the $60,000-$70,000 position, too) and say to them, "They have come in a bit short. I've got other things going on. This is a market where I can land. I would prefer it being there, but if they don't value me sufficiently. Then I will be very happy this next place I'm talking to.

By doing this, you're going to force them to earn their check and their faith..

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Win-Win Means You Lose in a Salary Negotiation | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why you should not negotiate using a win-win philosophy.

 

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In salary negotiation, most of us have been brought up to believe in the notion of a "win-win negotiation." Corporations, however, had been brought up to believe in the idea of a "winning negotiation." Win-win isn't really a part of the lexicon.

They may attempt to entrap the unsuspecting job hunter, supplier, or anyone else in this notion of win-win, but, ultimately, what they are going to try to do is have you make concessions and then to do as few as possible.

When you enter into a negotiation, in all probability is the last thing you should be talking about is salary. Why? Very simple. They're going to find it much easier to try to make other secondary concessions because they are going to want you to concede on salary issues because, after all, look at all the stuff we gave up! There is really nothing that they are giving up.

When you get to the salary part, I want to encourage you to remember this is not about you being a nice girl or a nice boy. It's about you getting as much as possible to get you target because, again, at the end of the day, when you go home, the company is still going to be around. Are you going to be satisfied with the salary that you negotiated?

You have to remember:
1. Your job is to win. The person on the other side of the table is the representative of that firm whose there to get you to give up what you want. You have to be prepared to use your one negotiating chip (the ability to stand up and walk away from the table) and say, "I don't think this is a good deal for me," and make them circle back to you. If they don't, remember, that indicates that there was more, no bargaining there anyway.
2. What number is going to cause you to walk away from the negotiation.

Rather than waste your breath, again, start off with all the secondary stuff. When you get to the money, be conscious of what will cause you to walk away. And, actually, if you need to do it, do it.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Another Salary Negotiation Tactic | Job Search Radio

There are easy ways and hard ways to negotiate . . . and ones in the middle. This one is a mid-to easy way.

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I am here today to give you another tactic for salary negotiation. I have published a lot of them as videos; the reason I publish a lot, is because each of you has a different ability to tolerate the stress of the negotiation. Some of you want what I call the easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself; some are open to the 2nd easiest way; some people really want to get in there and fight. There are also lots of different gradients between those extremes.

Here is 1 of those midrange options that I think is very helpful.

The 1st thing is that if the firm wants you to fill out an application, leave the salary area blank. If you need to scribble something, do so but generally leave it blank. When they verbally ask you, "I noticed this was blank in your application (they know what you're doing), How much are you making now/how much you looking for?" You basically respond by saying, "I'm much more interested in the nature of the work. I will be doing for your firm than I am a specific number. So, no, I'm not going to take $14,000 per year, but I would expect you to be reasonable with your job offer."

From they are, some firms are going to go and take a 2nd stab at this. They will say something along the lines of, "you know… I need a number here." You can respond by saying, "I will consider any reasonable offer."

What this does is stall. If they go at it again, "I don't know how I could be more clear. I would consider any reasonable offer."

Once they have made the offer, assuming that this worked ... By the way, I forgot to mention one thing. If it doesn't work, you've learned something about the firm. You've learned that they just have to "break you shoes. Open I didn't want to use a male anatomical part there)." They are there to break you down so that you can form.

Particularly if you are in sales and marketing, never ever conceded this point. What are you saying about yourself as a salesperson? As a matter of fact, after you have given the answer the 1st time (What's really important to me is the nature of the work in the product and service) what you want to be doing if they come at you again is to say something along the lines of, "hey, look, if I made it easy for you, you would question my ability as a salesperson, right. What my job here is to give you a sense of who I am and what I'm capable of, what my achievements of been and what I can do for you. I asked that I be treated fairly and let's move on here."

Again, if they push you, it tells you something. They really want you to operate. "In a square box." You don't want to work for a firm that you can find you in such a way (in my opinion).

Here's the fun thing to do once you get the offer. Ready? This 1 I love.

I want you to pause for a second, "were going to be making you an offer. We really want you to come on board. The seller part of the offers a base of $120,000. " Then they start laying out the additional percentages.

I want you to turn around and go (Particularly if you are the sales), "120. Hmmm. " What that does is let them know that the number isn't quite right, and opens up the conversation for negotiation. From there, you can follow up with data that you have gotten from various sources about what someone with your background should be earning in a role like this.

You can always except the 120 and all the other stuff And after you've done the salary, you cannot go at all the other conditions and benefits, too. Whatever the percentages are on top of the base, start trying to negotiate those as well. Start at the salary number just by repeating it back because with that does is give them the idea that you are comfortable saying yes and that is a subject for negotiation that they want to enter into with you.

So, again, another approach, another way of doing a negotiation that I hope you can execute

 

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