keep your resume on file

We’ll Keep Your Resume on File? Does It Mean Anything? | Job Search Radio

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answer someone’s question about whether “We’ll keep your resume on file,” means anything.
 
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Does "We'll keep your resume on file," mean anything?

If you could see me, you'll know I am not 21 anymore. I will simply say that when I was 21 and I would mail out resumes to employers, I would get the form letter back that said, "we will keep your resume on file," it meant absolutely nothing because when a new position opened up, do you really think that they ran to the file cabinet to look to see if they had any resumes that were suitable? As a matter of fact, does anyone have a file cabinet anymore for anything other than storing bills and hiding stuff?

At the end of the day in The Stone Ages, it meant nothing. Database times are little bit different.

Some firms are just too busy to do anything more than input into their system so that they can deal with government reporting. However, a lot of firms input into the database (they are "file" as you will) and the times when new positions open up, they're doing searches to identify people that they have had some contact with. Those can be individuals who may have interviewed well with that they never interviewed. They have them in the database now and, as a result, they have the option to which back to you.

Again, a lot of firms are way too busy to do this I would rather just go to the expense of running another ad or starting networking from scratch all over again, instead of checking their own systems. However, a lot of smart firms are doing it.

It may have meaning and it may not have meaning. There is no way of ever knowing.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
 
Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com and then forward your question to me at the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Should I Have a Web Site? | Job Search Radio

 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answer someone’s question about whether or not to have a website.
 
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"I'm a university student and applying for jobs." Apparently they are graduating." Should I have a personal website? I have a Github and a Slideshare account already. Is it a good idea to make a personal website with the resume and all the links to Github and Slideshare and other sites?"

Here's my thought. You can do that and it is going to take time. You then have to think about SEO. There is a simpler way to go about doing it.

1. Get to a service like about.me or flavors.me and link all your sites through there. They have far more readily found discovery then your site will have.

2. Get a simple blog account like Blogger or a wix page. Put your resume there. Link everything to it from about.me or flavors.me. You will accomplish the same thing and it will take you a lot less time. Their results are going to be far more effective than what your website will probably draw.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​.
 
Would you like to have a question for me? Send $25 through PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail and then forward your question to me at the same address.
 
JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn as well as on Facebook

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job SearchProblems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Is It Normal? | Job Search Radio

Is It Normal?
 
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Is it normal for a company to refuse sending details of an offer by email before I verbally accept an offer?

This person is orally received an offer, they want to get an offer letter, there wondering why they don't have the letter as of yet. Is it normal for me to say yes and then have the letter sent?

The answer is, "Yes," it is normal. The reason is, why should they go through all the final approvals, have admin type something, send it to you only to find out that you are not going to accept the job offer? Isn't that kind of pointless from your standpoint? I sure know it's pointless from their standpoint.

While the offer letter does is confirm what you have already been told. You are going to be paid a certain amount, that you might be eligible for a bonus, the offer is contingent upon you successfully completed a background check, etc. etc.

If they lied to you, no one is asking you to quit your job until you have the offer letter. All the offer letter does is confirm what you have been told. If you were them, harnessing manpower/woman power or however you want to describe it to process this offer letter and you intend to turn it down, what was the point anyway?

They want to hear the acceptance from you 1st, then do all the mechanics to deliver a letter for you. It is completely normal.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers the question as to whether a situation is normal when his employer extends someone and want them to verbally accept a job offer before they put the offer in writing.
 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

 

I Was Low Balled on an Offer! | Job Search Radio

EP 303 him Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation where he was low-balled by a firm he received an offer from and hen received a counteroffer from his current employer.

If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

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I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

 

I’m Getting a Job Offer AND . . .

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from someone where they are about to receive a job offer from a firm but prefer another job at that same firm.

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The question is, "Should/can I ask for another position in a company during my final interview process upon a job offer?" The language is in great but it seems to translate into he or she is getting a job offer and it seemed like the not happy with his job and want to find out if they can ask about another job. At the same company.

My 1st reaction is you're kidding, right? How many interviews have you gone through and how many people's time have you wasted interviewing for a job that you're not interested in? Now some people have been coached, particularly very junior ones, into thinking that what they should be doing is get the offer and then they can finagle things.

Now if I were this employer, I would rescind any offer that I have extended for this person because you're obviously not ask interested in this job. If you've gone through 2, 3, 4 or maybe 5 interviews and now you want to talk about another job, why would they make you an offer for THIS JOB? All they would say is, "STOP. Let's evaluate you for this other job. They would bring other people into play for this original job and they're going to have a hard time trusting you because the reality is that you have not been trustworthy.

They been very clear about the job that they are trying to fill, and you haven't been trustworthy about what you are looking for. Now you pull this out last minute.

That's the fact. I hope you get clean about this with yourself and if you're not interested in this, stop the process and say, "Before use extend an offer to me, I would rather interview for another position."

They may respond by saying, "That's great. Have a great day and the good life." That's better than joining the firm and doing the job that you don't want.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  Him him him

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

First Job. Changing Jobs Again Quickly | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question he received on quota.com about changing jobs quickly after taking your first position.

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"If you've only been at your 1st job for less than a year will applying for another one. Leave a bad impression?" That's the question. 1st job, leaving quickly, will leave a bad impression?

The answer is, "Yes." However, it doesn't really matter. Let me give you the comparison.

It took an exam in 3rd grade and got a poor score. There you are at age 22. Doesn't really matter that in 3rd grade you flunked the math test? Of course not.

The same thing is with your 1st job. What is most important is what you learned from that experience. What you take away from it that you can apply to your next organization and the one after that.

If there becomes a pattern of you changing jobs frequently, that definitely will hurt.

However, 1st job? Relatively quick tour of duty (remember we don't know how long this is. For all I know it is a year and 1/2 and this person has a value of staying a job for 2 years)? Let's assume that is less than the year and this person wants to change jobs. Will leave a bad taste in this employers mouth? Yeah, probably.

But, like this 3rd grade math exam,, it doesn't matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What Do You Do With Business Cards?

What Do You Do With Business Cards?

What should you do with all of the business cards you collect? Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you exactly what to do with them.

 

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I want to talk with you about coping with all those business cards you receive at networking group meetings and other places.

I grew up in the days when business cards were very important and you want to collect as many cards as possible. In recent times they have fallen into a state where people don't really care about them as much. You could be in situations where collecting cards be of value to you. Your meeting someone in networking group; you're in an elevator and run into someone that you know and the easiest way to make connection is to exchange cards. The question becomes what you do with these cards?

Back in the stone ages, you toss them in a drawer, put a rubber band around them. If too many of them accumulated there. Obviously, we don't have to do that today. I is a product called Camcard. There are lots of different products out there like this one. Basically, what you do is scan the card, it populates different fields. You may have to do a bit of an edit after the scanning to make sure that the right data is in the fields. There will be an image of the card and the convenience of having it auto populate fields so that, this way, it's easy for you to get back in touch with people, easy for you to pull up to data for you to do that, and easy for you to stay in contact with them so that you can send that LinkedIn connection request to them right away.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Should I Stay Underemployed for At Least a Year So I Don’t Damage My Resume? | Job Search Radio

The details are sad. The answer isn’t, just like you would expect from me.
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Someone wrote to me with the question. "Should I stay in a job where I am underemployed for at least a year if I don't want to damage my resume?"

Here's the extra detail – – "I am 40 and I am earning $14 an hour in a job as a social media manager for a small company on Long Island. I'm being told I need to stay in his job for at least a year before I start looking for a better job. The position is an unchallenging dead-end with no advancement opportunities. Why should I stay?"

The simple answer is that there is no reason that you should stay. The "however" is I'm wondering whether you have the actual skills and experience yet to command more money. After all, why didn't you get a job paying more than $14 an hour if you have those skills and experiences?

Through question becomes how can you get them? If it is not at your current job, where can you get them? What training can you get? What can you do on the side to beef up your capabilities? To me, it's not about staying there for a year. That's the kind of crap that agencies tell job hunters that no longer applies.

What really matters is why was it necessary to take a $14 an hour job doing this at a firm with a dead-end? Why were you unable to get something better?

Usually, there are 2 reasons. One reason is lack of skills. The 2nd reason is lack of job search skills. That is what JobSearchCoachingHQ.com it is about. You can visit the site and get a sense of how I help people. There, you can get one-on-one coaching so that you're not just simply learning through trial and error and getting stuck. At least, the job-search side of this can be handled.

I can't help you become excellent at what you will careers. I can help you with your job search.

Again, there's no reason to stay. However, there may be reasons why you got stuck in this role then makes sense to look at. There are things that you can do to correct them. To me, it is not about the company; is really about you at this point. There are things you can do to get stronger, both in terms of your career and in terms of your job search skills.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

 
You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

I’m At My Wits End. Job Hunting is Getting Frustrating. Does Anyone Have Any Suggestions? | Job Search Radio

Yeah, I do. Follow my advice carefully. It will make a difference. Job hunting doesn’t have to be hard, difficult, painful or take so long.
 
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I wrote a short ebook for Kindle. $0.99. I'm going to summarize it for you.

By the way, the way I'm selling it now. It has 2 additional features. A guide to writing resumes and a guide to interviewing. Even knowing how to do this, it is still worth buying for those 2 items.

Here it goes. The book is called, "Diagnosing Job Search Problems." Here is how to diagnose them.

Assuming that you have the skills required, if you're not getting interviews, your resume sucks. If you're not getting calls from recruiters based upon your LinkedIn profile, your LinkedIn profile sucks. If you are getting initial phone interviews but you are not getting invited in for in person interviews, you don't know how to do a phone interview. If you are getting to a 1st round in person interview but no invitations back, you don't interview as well as you think you do… You see where I'm going?

You can diagnose the problem. Every step along the way.

You don't do a good job selling yourself in any of these modalities. If you are not getting results. So, break it down for yourself. That's how you diagnose the issue.

At the end of the day, what you need to do is make changes. There, I can't help you right now because I don't know what you doing in order to give you specific advice. But, for job hunters. In general, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has a ton of great content to help people find work and correct mistakes that they're making in the job search . AND It is not enough to watch a video or listen to a podcast or read a book or what have you. You have to put into practice

I was coaching someone yesterday before the interview. He's a guy who isn't particularly sophisticated, very talented in what he does but he needs some work. Suddenly, after starting to work on my site, he has interviews going on. He asked for some advice for how to prepare for in person interview because it was the 1st 1 that he had been close to 20 years; he went on his interview on short notice, well prepared, did a great job. The hiring manager told him he was the 1st person in the door, I'm away next week, let me know if anything changes for you… All the right sort of things, doesn't guarantee these getting the job. But he put on a good show and feels good about himself.

Why? Because you learn what's necessary and has been practicing in order to execute. Great athletes practice. Michael Jordan? Lebron James? Pick the sport. There is not a person in the game who is not practicing relentlessly and you walk into interviews and you wing it.

By the way, you have, how much experience writing resumes? Zero. You may read them as a hiring manager, but that doesn't make your resume writer or good interviewer. Trust me. 40 some odd years of doing this… Most of you guys are awful.

Get help. Get a coach to help you. I'm not talking about a third-party recruiter because all. They are going to do is coaching into a job that they represent. They're not there to represent you. They are representing a client of theirs who was trying to hire someone and they are going to try to "the nests you" into that job. That's fine up to a point, but it is not impartial advice.

Get some help. In a coach. Don't just simply rely upon friends, family, former managers… You know, people who know little more than you do. Maybe? These people haven't been through it as long as I have.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has more than 400 videos, podcasts, books, articles, all designed to help you find work more quickly. In addition, you can ask me questions and, as I did with this person, I will prep you on interviews, help you with the salary is and I'll walk you through different steps of the process, personally.

Again, that is JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. Hope to see you at the site. Hope you have a great day and, you know, you need help. You are an amateur in this area. I will finish this up by saying, we've all heard of the 10,000 hour rule popularized by Malcolm Gladwell….It takes 10,000 hours of focused work in order to become expert at something.
And you have, how much experience writing a resume?
Interviewing,

I can go on and on with this, but you are a babe in the woods and you don't know what you are doing., Acting like an amateur. Do with the professional athletes do – – get a coach. Practice with that approach. Get better. You'll get a job.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What Should I Do If I am Rejected For a Job I Love? | Job Search Radio

Being rejected for a job can feel very painful but there are two things you can do and one of them may help you win the job you love.

 

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"What should I do after being rejected from the job. I love?"

He or she follows by saying, "I'm desperately looking for a job in a foreign country where I got my degree and finally went to the final round for position. I love. The positions I can apply for our rear end, after the final interview, they said, 'No.' I feel so devastated and don't know what to do next."

With regard to this firm, it's over for now. I say for now because it doesn't mean that you can try working there for other positions or other opportunities. The fact is, you have been turned down for this job. What can you do?

Answer. Learn from this. What did you do, right? What could you have done better? Where was the background just to be superior? Where was adjudged to be not as good as the person they chose?

You might try messaging back to the firm and says to them something along the lines of, "I'm obviously disappointing choice, but I would like to learn from the experience. I understand you chose someone else. I am not going to argue the point. Where did you perceive the other person was superior to me?" You have to keep the promise of not getting into an argument because then you will knock yourself out from years to come because everyone there will remember you. Not only that, when they leave, they will remember you at the next firm and block you from joining there.

I understand you have an issue because you are looking for something in a foreign country, and you may be dealing with visas and other bones of contention that this firm was willing to handle for you. This job is gone and all you can really do is learn from it. If they tell you, "We didn't find you strong enough in such and such," improve upon it. If they say, "you are too aggressive," look at that as to whether it was true or not. If they say you are not aggressive, look at that and see if that was true or not. After all, sometimes there is pushback because they are afraid that you're going to try and argue with them. Sometimes there is pushback in giving an honest answer. for a million reasons, including, they are too busy.

What ever it is, from the vantage point of view, this is a learning experience. For now, you are not getting this job. The person that they hired may not work out. You might just put a tickler in your system for 60 or 90 days out that politely says, "I know you hired someone for this role, but perhaps they are not performing as well as you would've liked. I thought I would reach out and see if you are satisfied."

You may not get a response which actually is a response. But, this is a fun way to see if by some miracle, there's an opportunity for you to reenter the scene here. Not right now. Like I said. For now, you have to learn from it. In the future, do like I said and put a reminder in your phone to contact them 60 days from now, 90 days from now, as if they are completely satisfied with the person they hired. I suggest this because there's a statistic about employer remorse related to people that they hire.

I think the statistic is that 60% of hiring managers have buyers remorse after they hire someone. Take advantage of that. See it see if there's a possibility that you can reintroduce yourself if you are not goofing now.

In the meantime, you're getting information about how you can improve and do it so that this way, if the miracle happens and they do want to talk with you again in 60 or 90 days, you've done some work to improve yourself in the area that they perceived the deficiency today and you can do a better job.

This strategy applies to any job. It's not just the foreign job. Any job for which are turned down, try to improve and see if in 60 or 90 days after you've gotten the notice of rejection whether they are completely satisfied with the person they hired, and whether they consider talking with you again.

​Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!