First Job. Changing Jobs Again Quickly

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question he received on quota.com about changing jobs quickly after taking your first position.

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"If you've only been at your 1st job for less than a year will applying for another one. Leave a bad impression?" That's the question. 1st job, leaving quickly, will leave a bad impression?

The answer is, "Yes." However, it doesn't really matter. Let me give you the comparison.

It took an exam in 3rd grade and got a poor score. There you are at age 22. Doesn't really matter that in 3rd grade you flunked the math test? Of course not.

The same thing is with your 1st job. What is most important is what you learned from that experience. What you take away from it that you can apply to your next organization and the one after that.

If there becomes a pattern of you changing jobs frequently, that definitely will hurt.

However, 1st job? Relatively quick tour of duty (remember we don't know how long this is. For all I know it is a year and 1/2 and this person has a value of staying a job for 2 years)? Let's assume that is less than the year and this person wants to change jobs. Will leave a bad taste in this employers mouth? Yeah, probably.

But, like this 3rd grade math exam,, it doesn't matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Do This Before Submitting Your Resume

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter demands that you do this before you send out any resume.

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You are responding to an ad that you heard about. You heard something about a position open at a networking event you went to. Now you're going to send your resume in.

Before you send it out, read your resume carefully and look for this – – how is my resume actually demonstrate that I fit this role?

What in my background will come across In the resume that is going to cause them to say, "Ah! . This person can do the job!"

If you cannot answer the question, your resume needs a rewrite for this job. Otherwise, all you are doing is sending out spam. You know,, the broken watch is right twice a day-- maybe a work sometimes, maybe it doesn't. Most of the time it doesn't.

For you, just ask yourself the question. Don't give yourself a BS answer. Be forthright with yourself. How is your resume actually show that you fit the job and how far does someone have to read in order to find it? if you think it is on page 2, move it on to page 1.You have to use your cover letter to draw attention to it so that they know to read there.

Otherwise, it is a waste of time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Make The Changes the Recruiter Asks for ​

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to make quality changes to your resume when you were asked to make them.

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Let me just start off the story. The story is 1 of a young actor who has written a screenplay. He sent it to a number of studios or 100 studios (it doesn't really matter how many) there is a point where his wife is expecting a baby, he is running out of money. A studio finally says to him, "We would like to do the movie but we don't want you to be the lead actor in. We would like to cast someone else and it's." He turned them down, telling them it has to be him.

He is running out of money and he knows that if he has to get through the weekend. He will have to cave in to the studio's demands. However, he holds on and holds on and gambles that they will cave in to him and on Friday afternoon, he received a call that said, "okay. You can play the lead." He signs the contract and out of that, Sylvester Stallone became the star of "Rocky," the movie won best picture and the career was really born. He was an actor earlier on but nothing like he became.

The story really isn't about Stallone. This is about being willing to gamble everything. For a lot of you, you play it safe in life. You do things that are comfortable. You do things because you don't want to rock the boat. Where is that really getting you? At the end of the day, it is getting you a nice mediocre future; you're allowing yourself to be controlled by Mommy and Daddy Big Business and your career has no safety to it.

What do you really dream of doing? What are you willing to bet everything on? What are you willing to "go for broke" to get? Do you even think that way anymore? What is the price you are willing to pay? Do you have buy-in from your family? Scare them and tell them those Stallone story if you need to.

At the end of the day, most people play a pretty safe. The voices in your head are telling you that it can't be done.

There are a lot of things that people of said can't be done. Running a sub 4 minute mile was 1 of those things for the longest time until someone was able to do it. Then, many others followed immediately thereafter because the belief system in their heads were changed.

What can you do? What are you willing to bet everything on? What are you willing to gamble on in order to be successful?

You may be happy as you are now and this podcast is obviously not for you. However, for those of you who have been settling for what the world is giving you. It is time.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Are You Willing to Go For Broke?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses going for broke as part of your strategy and uses the story of an actor to make his point.

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So you send a resume to a recruiter, you had a phone interview, they make a suggestion for you to tweak your resume in a particular way, you send back a resume where you change 2 words. Why did you do that?

The recruiters tell you exactly what he or she needs . And they are telling you that not to waste your time, but because the client is communicated to them exactly what they need to see. Let me give you an example.

I'm doing a search for client (I'm not going to tell you where they are but it is a C-level position with this firm) And they have changed directions on what they are looking for. Instead of an executive type, they want to hire someone who came up the technology ranks who can do some technology work but has managed resources at a firm of a particular size. GREAT!

They are clear now about what they want.I can handle the fact that they change directions; I'm not happy that I wasted time on it, but I got back to 1 of the candidates I qualified for it and told them that, "the position and the client Have changed directions in a way that I thought sooner the better.. I'm looking at you at your resume and needs to have a couple of tweaks. Can you get that to me later today or tomorrow?"

"Sure," and he sends back a document where one change had been made in one sentence. It addressed none of the Concerns about size and scope of the firms that he had done work for, did make clear his current technology expertise... He wasted everyone's time.

Don't be a fool.Do what you are being coached to do as long as it is not a lie. I want to I want to be clear about that.. Do what you are being coached to do as long as it is not a lie. I don't believe in lying; I know you don't as well. Everyone gets hurt when lies occur BUT the recruiter is telling you something when they are asking for a revision tooth your resume.

If you said to them, "You can make the change," They can't. Yes, they could type a couple words But you know the depth of your skill far better than they. Put it in the resume when they ask for! It takes 10 minutes for you to do it. It takes an hour for them because they don't know you. Because they are going to send it back to you for approval, you will say, "That's not exactly right" save time and type out the few words to make it accurate.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

The Best Way to Find Work After You Graduate College

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the best way to find a job after you graduate.

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I'm often asked to help out a student with finding work. The 1st question I ask is, "During your 4 years in college, what did you do to make relationships with people who are already working?" Often, the answer is nothing. I know that was true of me. You are here looking. I want to give you the best advice that I can.

If you are still in school, you are basically preparing for the job market is to make friends with people who are already in the job market who are working for firms that you want to work for. For example, if you want to work for a startup, make friends with people who work for that start. Don't know who they are? This is your time to get on LinkedIn, start following the firm, connecting with people who work for the firm, trying to set up an informational interview with people who work for the firm. From that, start working to build relationships with people. You are not asking for a job. You're asking questions about what it is like to work there, what you need to know in order to do it, how does the firm hire interns or could I do some gratis work here as a way of helping the firm to better… Stuff like that. When you work at this and talk to these people, you are 100% on your game! In this way, they see you at your best and manager half assed.

Start networking while you are in school because after graduation, it's really too late.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Knowing When to Fold’em in Your Job Search

If you are someone who is struggling in their job search, if you are someone who has been out of work for a while, this show will help you.

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Maybe it is been 6 or 8 months that you have been looking for work. Maybe you start interviewing quickly and had a lot of interviews and nothing is really clicking for you. Maybe, at the end of the day, you're trying and you just don't have the right experience for what firms look for. Maybe you not as good as you thought you were.

Here are your choices.
1. Try harder. I don't really think that's the right thing. I think you need to learn the kind of things you need to in order to be marketable or
2. Do something else.

That's often a hard thing for people to hear. But sometimes, the right choice is to do something completely different. I'm not talking about job search tactics; I'm talking about a new career.

There are plenty of jobs out there that are going unanswered. There are plenty of opportunities where firms are willing to take someone, certainly in manufacturing engineering, certainly in North Dakota were drilling is been going on., Certainly in the trades where jobs are going unfilled because we've all been telling college kids, "Go to school. Get an education." They come out with a degree with a degree in philosophy which allows them to be a university professor. There are limits in that. The certain times of the year where universities hire. A certain number of people who are going to be higher and, if you are an adjunct, and you don't get invited on, you are doomed in many respects.

Maybe you're an accountant who has been out of work for 8 months and doors are being knocked down for you. Maybe you work in Wall Street operations oriented programming or in a management position and something just isn't working for you.

I can work with you to try to determine what the problems are. Yes, I do coaching. Yes, I take phone calls. 1 of the other things that I do is I tell people when it is time to fold them.

Sometimes, that's the smartest decision that you can make instead of keeping on hitting your head against the wall and feeling like a failure is to do something completely different.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

How to Learn from Being Rejected

How to Learn from Being Rejected

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to use these ideas to learn from being turned down for a job.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TO JOBSEARCHCOACHINGHQ.COM

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You not going to get every job that you interview for and I do not get a get an interview for every job you submit your resume to. This isn't about criticism. This is about learning from the experience. I want to focus on the situations where you have been interviewed and rejected..

I think it's important to start off by acknowledging any feelings that you have. Are you feeling mad? Are you feeling sad? Give yourself a little bit of time. I'm not talking about weeks. I'm talking about an hour where if you are angry, beat up something in your home or apartment. I don't mean a person. I am referring to taking a tennis racket and hit the pillow. If you are sad, it is okay to cry.

Then, you move onto the next thing which is, "How did they analyze you?" How did they evaluate and assess you? What were they looking for in the course of the evaluation? How well did you answer their questions? Was that really your best or did you give them something that was 50% of your best?

Most people when they start doing their self critique, "I did a great job!" Maybe you didn't. Give yourself a little bit of time. Review your answers to their questions. Then, ask yourself, "Could I have done better?" That's asking your self just to be clear about that.

Here's the next thing to do – – within a short period of time of having the rejection communicated to you, send an email or text if that is available to you, directed to the person that you interviewed with and ask, "Could I get a few minutes of your time? I just want to get your feedback for areas of improvement. " Particularly in the case of final interviews where it is you, and 1 or 2 other people that you have been competing with, this is a great approach.

You called, set up a meeting, coffee, whatever, and then say, "I don't want to ask you why you picked the other person. I want to ask you where could I have done a better job? Where was my experience deficient in your eyes or how was the other person's experience, superior to mine so I can learn from that?" Especially, in a case where you are a finalist, this is a terrific approach. The reason I say that is because there are a lot of instances where the person they choose doesn't work out. Who do you think they start thinking of right away? You.

Getting that kind of feedback and then acting on it for your own benefit will help you develop the skills, knowledge and experience to be more effective in your next interview and, at the same time, allow them to maintain the contact with you, think of you should something happen and a new role opens up. As a matter of fact, you can say to them, "I was really so impressed with you and with your organization. If something else opens up please let me know."

This isn't about begging. I'm sure you didn't hear any sound of begging it and what I suggest you say. You don't want to sound like a beggar at that point. You just want to simply say what I previously suggested. Often, they will come back to you with something else.

This is an approach that really will be helpful to you. It may result in the job without firm. But, more likely, you can take that feedback, use it constructively and apply it to the next interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

Blasting a Resume

Job Search Mistakes–The Mass Blast

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the classic mistakes job hunters make–mass blasting a resume

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He was some bad job search advice I found on the web. I just want to tell you not to do. The bad advice is to send your resume out to everyone. EVERYONE!

Let me ask you a question. Do you like getting Viagra or Cialis is in your inbox? Well, that is what your resume becomes – – spam. You are spamming people. What you doing is mass blasting folks saying, "Hi! This is my resume. Hire me!" Or "do you have anything for me?"

Of course they do not.

Don't just simply spamming resume and then wander around saying, "Gee. I said that so many resumes and I haven't gotten any results." You are not getting results because you're not doing the research to find the jobs that fit your background. Look, I have videos that deal with how to find people in the firm who are hiring and finding hiring managers. There's also lots of content about this on the web.

When all is said and done, do not just send out resumes willy-nilly. You are stealing time from people. If you are sending it to third-party recruiters, you may think that it is their job, but it isn't their job. Their job is to fill jobs. Their job is not the place you in a job. You aren't paying them.

Don't just spamming resume. Be focused. Try to get to organizations that interest you and approach them selectively, rather than just the mass blast that is so offensive to all of us.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

What Do Hiring Managers Think of Resumes with Quantified Accomplishments? | Job Search Radio

If my resume describes actions that “increased revenue by $1 million,” or “Increased productivity by 50%,” are hiring managers generally impressed, or do they assume the numbers are all made up? Do they want to see numbers like that?

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I was asked the question that I thought was terrific and I don't want to go through it with you.

What do managers think of resumes with quantified accomplishments. In my resume describes actions that increase revenue by $1 million or increase productivity by 50%, or hiring managers generally impressed or do they assume the numbers are all made up? Do they want to see numbers like that?"

I'm not going to go into the, "Do they want to see numbers like that," part of the question; I want to talk about what do managers think of the resume itself.

To know that, you have to understand that business is the language of numbers. Money. Money is a number. Thus, if you can help an organization make or save money, this is valuable. I want to hear that again.

Make or save money.

It is not just that you help the firm make $1 million, to use this example. It could be that you reduce costs by 23%. Hearing that number has an impact, right?

Are they impressed with. They just think that you made it up?

That is what the interview is going to determine. Understand that you can throw a number around, but unless you can back it up, you are going to get chopped up like you are put into a Cuisinart. I'll simply say that, yes, they like to see numbers because, otherwise, you are just reciting tasks without discussing impact of your actions.

"I was responsible for such and such." Great. What did that do? How did it impact the firm that you work for?

Even if you work in a job that you consider "low level," there is a way that you can use numbers to your advantage. For example (I'm going to use a call center example, not because I think it's low level, but it's one that you can clearly understand), in a call center, there is a mean, for which people handle calls, right? Let's say the mean is that you handle 5 calls an hour and you handle 8, what you are able to talk about is that, over time, you handle 60% more calls than the average call center worker does a good firm. That gets peoples' attention. "60% more calls!"

You are responsible for a group of 27 that is responsible for (I'll use technology as an example), design, development and implementation of a system that helps generate $47 million for your firm. They notice that! It replaced a 12-year-old legacy system that clearly become obsolete and, in developing that system, we took advantage of… You get where I'm going with us? You layout what the story is and the result that you got. Otherwise, you're presenting yourself as a drone.

I am responsible for this. I do that. On and on and on… I am a task monkey. If you want to be seen as a task monkey, just talk about the task and not the result that the task delivered.

Yes, managers are impressed by it, but only if you can deliver the goods afterwards.

My answer the question is simple. Yes, included it. Don't avoid it. Unless of course you are making it up.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

How Can I Upgrade My Resume to Get Better Results? | Job Search Radio

I’ve coalesced a lot of my thinking about writing a great resume into into a single answer.

 

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The question for today is:

"How do you upgrade your resume to improve your job search?"

I want to make sure that we cover both cosmetics and content on the show..

1. A reasonable font size. You have to remember that a lot of people who are going to be reading your resume are older than you are. If you are in your 20s. You cannot go to an 8 point font. Work with at least 12. Use bullet pointut don't but overuse them. Fonts? I happen to like Calibri , but Georgia works well. Helvetica works well. Think in terms of an attractive font in that size.

2. Don't overuse bolding. You can pick bolding at particular times, but don't use it so overwhelmingly throughout your resume. If you are applying for a job that requires a particular skill or skill set, that is where you bold it as well as the names of organizations in your titles.

3. In terms of the header of the resume, don't embed it. Have your name there, your city, state and ZIP Code. Include phone numbers where you are reachable. Yes, make sure you check those phone numbers for messages. And respond to all of them.

4. When you are talking about role and responsibilities and accomplishments, make sure that you include metrics in your resume in terms of dollars saved and/or dollars earned. If that is not viable,, you might compare yourself to others and talk about something like, "Handled13% more (fill in the blank) than the average." That gives people aperspective that you are above average, and that you think in the language of business which is numbers.

5. Make sure your resume and LinkedIn profile are congruent.

6. Customize your resume to each individual position.

I want to make sure that you understand. No one looks at her resume as a document anymore. They are not printing out your resume and reading it intently. They are taking at most 6 seconds, two page-downs (8, page-down is when you hit your page down button on your keyboard. 2 is the most). If they get too far back in your history, they may only go back one. No one really cares about what you did in 1980 if that is what you page downs is. They care about things that you have done more recently. Those have to be strengthened and powerful and demonstrate your fit for the position involved and need to do it quickly.

If you don't, no one is ever going to find it later on in your resume to determine that you have done that kind of work. That's because the experience will be considered "too old."

Those are a few basic steps to improve your resume and and to make sure that it gets a hiring firm's attention.

7. Last point you're going to repeat something.  Customize your resume to demonstrate your fit and match with the job description.  Make sure your resume and LinkedIn profile are congruent.

 

​If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

Do you think employers are trying to help you?Last point and I’m going to repeat something.  Customize your resume to match the position description that you are applying for.  To ensure that you hit all the points.  Make sure that your LinkedIn profile is congruent with that customization.

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!