Your Best Position for Negotiating Salary | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses your most advantaged position for negotiating salary and how to play it.
 
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You need to understand that with most organizations, they have salary guidelines that HR and hiring managers works with. It's not like they can take you from making $80,000 per year and give you $160,000. No matter how good you are, it just doesn't work that way.

With big companies, the basic strategy is always that you should get two offers. Not one but two. You have to time this out around the same time so that in this way, there's a certain amount of pressure on the employer. After all, from their standpoint, they have spent a lot of money interviewing and assessing candidates and deciding that you are the right one.

What you want to be doing is getting two firms in play. They're not going to bid aggressively against one another. It's not like they're going to say, "We're going to offer you $120,000."

"We are going to offer you one $130,000."

"When you change your mind and we're going to offer you $140,000!"

They will work to exceed something; don't talk with you about some of the benefits that they offer you. They may "goose" certain things but when push comes to shove in the big company market, normally, the lowball bidder tries to match the highball bidder. They can go back to the highball firm and say, "I have 2 offers at the same level. I prefer yours. Can you do a touch better?"

Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate A Higher Salary for Yourself." What that technique will do is get them to boost the offer little bit more so that you up the ante.

Now, at small companies, you get two offers, a big company and a small company, often the small company will do a little bit better, but they will never really match the big company. The big company just has deeper pockets. Maybe you'll get more benefits, more stock options, more things along those lines that will turn you on.

Recognize that a small company or a start up, sometimes their reaction is to go, "You know, if you are considering that another firm, you are not our kind of person." You have to be cautious with small firms when you are doing small company versus big company competing situations.

Two small companies. 2 startups. They get into (excuse my language) pissing wars with one another where they are beating down the other firms ideas, where they are talking with you about how good they are. You really need to bring them back to the money.

"I really appreciate more options here."

"Well, this is what we give out to people."

"I know. AND I would like more options here. I would like to get more money."

Do something that pushes them. Whoever comes in a little bit higher, that's the one you go to.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Who Should I Connect With on LinkedIn? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question about who to connect with on LinkedIn during a lengthy job search.
 
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"What is the best way to determine whether a stranger on LinkedIn would be an ideal contact during a lengthy jobs are?"

The language in this question just makes me want to go crazy?

I'm going to avoid "the lengthy jobs are" part of this question. To me that is irrelevant to answering the question. What is important is how do you determine whether someone is able to help you? You can't guarantee outcomes, but you can look at probabilities.

If you are targeting organizations, you want to target someone who's in authority at that organization. You are not looking for the CIO if you are a programmer. You are not looking for the president if you are an accountant. The power disparity is too great; they will kick you down through the chain of command very quickly.

What you want to be doing is building relationships. This is not about being transactional. That is what you criticize third-party recruiters for and then you try to go out there and become transactional yourself. What you need to be doing is looking at people who are in positions of authority within an organization that you are targeting so that in this way, when you do outreach to them ("hi! I am looking for advice."), Think of an informational interview.

"I'm looking for some advice. I am a such and such. You are further along in your career trail than I am. How did you get to where you are? Can I schedule time for a Skype or a phone call or an in person interview with you?"

Your preference should be in person or Skype to chat with them for just 10 or 15 minutes and what you are doing is trying to build a relationship. If you think you are going to get one connection request, what acceptance and think you're going to get hired, you are deluding yourself and you have been going for your search all wrong.

Again, this is the slow road to using your LinkedIn network. If you think about it, if you are 24 years old and you are thinking ahead to being 34 years old (I note that seems like a long time from now) or 44 or 54, the relationships that you build now can be very pivotal. I am older than that; I'm now 66 and worked in recruiting for more than 40 years.

From my vantage point there are a lot of people that I have known from the beginning, with whom I have develop relationships, who have hired from me, they have taken jobs from me and we have become friends over the course of time. This is really how you use LinkedIn. It is building your network of connections.

If you are in a long jobs are and have been looking for a long time without getting any results, you've got bigger problems than just simply the LinkedIn connection. There is something wrong with how you are conducting your job search. Your resume may stink; you may interview terribly. You need coaching along those lines, and I will simply say that I have a lot of videos that you can watch at JobSearchCoachingHQ,com that will help you with that

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017
JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedInFollow Me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Avoid This Email Mistake | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses this email mistake too many people make when sending out their resume.

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When people send out email, sometimes they are sending a big bulk email out. I know you know that you should not put all those addresses into the "To" field. That is not what the show is about. It is about sending out bulk email altogether and the mistake that it causes.

Even if you "blind submit" something to a whole bunch of people, what often happens is spam filters recognize that there is nothing in the "To" field and that it has not been personally addressed it may deflect your message to a spam folder. As a result, no one sees your email.

As cumbersome as this may be (and it really isn't). Everything may need to be addressed to each individual. I'm not suggesting that you re-key every letter that you send, even though I do believe that if you send the generic form letter to each person, collecting of response is going to be very small. It's like the broken watch that is right twice a day.

Think in terms of the basic email that you want to send put one address in the "To" field, anger messages, and are more likely NOT to be caught by spam filters and more likely to get through.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

The New Background Check | Job Search Radio

EP 306 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the new way firms check you out.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

What Recruiters Look for In A Resume/CV? | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what recruiters look for in a resume or CV.
 
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Let me just read this question to you; you will understand. "As a recruiter, what are the things that you look for in a CV/resume of the potential candidate?"

What you think someone's looking for? You are sending a resume to me. Do you think if I don't have a job open the fit your background, do you think I'll be calling you and saying, "Hi! I would just like to talk with you and understand everything about you so that when a job comes up, I will know everything about you, even though you might have already found a job by now." Of course, not.

What I'm looking for is based upon the fact that when you send a resume to me, you in some way, shape or form think I have a job your background would fit. That's it. That's all I care about.

Within that, I may segment further. If I'm looking for someone with a foreign-exchange background in technology, I'm going don't try to see if you have the background with that technology in a foreign-exchange setting. Real simple!

I'm then going to try to see whether or not you are someone who, shall we say, has worked with "pedigree organizations." That's because I'm going to try to segment. Have you done this in an organization that is well regarded by my client or not.

Fundamentally, I'm starting off with do you have the background that I am looking for? Then, I may discern a little bit further. Like I said, an organization my client has some respect for. Have you done the work at the level that my client is looking for or are you a CIO who is willing to take a lead the position. It's not good work.

On and on and on, I am trying to make quick comparisons because I don't have time to study. Your homework is to make the case for yourself that you fit this role that you are sending a resume for. If you don't said, don't send it. Otherwise, all you are doing is wasting my time. I would rather just get a resume that says, "on spec." At least in this way I can respond want to have something useful. Then I know I can just import it into my database and work from there.

 
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

It Isn’t Just Networking | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you that networking is only one part of the process. There is a lot more you need to do while you are networking.

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This 1 really isn't the quick fix. This is really a career strategy for you that you need to adopt in order to really land positions all the time that will leverage your skills and move you forward.

Is what I want to tell you. It isn't just networking that's important. Everyone is out there networking these days. The bums, the losers, the mediocre people are all out there networking, too.

What are you going to do in order to stand out?

Standing out isn't about doing it in your job search. It is about doing it every day in your career. How to be the leader? How to be the person who is the best? I do certain things to stand out in how I present myself. I do with my videos. I do with my podcasts. I do with my e-zines… A whole host of different ways that job hunters and hiring managers get a sense of how I think and how I operate. That has really profited me.

In your career, what can you do to stand out in your workplace? How can you be the leader in your organization, even if you are a staff person? How can you demonstrate your leadership and commitment to excellence that allows you to stand out from the losers and the bums and the mediocre people so that people will go, "Hey! This person is really good!"

That's really the strategy for you when you're networking. It isn't just simply about doing it between job searches; it's a career objective. Where can you write? What trade groups can you become a part of and contribute to. Where can you be the leader in your life that is going to cause you to stand out from the mediocrity that exists out there.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Re-Contacting a Company After You’ve Turned Down a Job Offer | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a someone’s question about re-contacting a company that they turn down a job offer from.

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Here's the question: Can I asked to be a job candidate again for a company to whom I told I was taking another offer? The language is a little quirky. I'm going to translate it.

Apparently this person received an offer or backed out of an interview cycle with a firm, saying that he is gotten another offer. Apparently, they decide to turn down that offer , and now is wondering whether or not he or she can go back and talk to that firm about a job.

The answer is, "Sure." There is no taboo about this except the awkwardness that you may feel about going back and saying this.

In approaching them again, recognize that on their side they are going to have questions. What happened? Why did it happen? They're going to wonder if you received an offer and turned it down. What was wrong with that offer… Things along those lines. They're going to wonder if they're going to be similarities that might cause you to turn down their offer. They're going to want to see if you are logical. They going to wonder if there is a practical reason why you did this. Whether you are sincere. Whether you can express yourself well about this in a way that is convincing.

Part of your responsibility here is to tie it into their circumstances. "I was really excited about this job. I received an offer and was ready to say yes and then something came to my attention about the firm (or about the hiring manager) that gave me cause for pause. " For example, the offer wasn't what I was led to believe it would be is a reason that would be valid.

"I was led to believe will be for such and such amount. It was for significantly less." You get you get the idea.

"So what is it that you're looking from us in the way of compensation?"

" For this job. I was looking for such and such. They offered me $30,000 less and I thought it was appropriate to turn that down." You get the idea.

They're going to want to explore the circumstances that caused that offer to go away or be turned down and then you're going to be looking to switch the conversation at a particular point in talking about their job, get into an evaluation process with them.

They may continue with you by saying, "Where are you in your job search now?" That's because they may be starting at the beginning with you (again). If you have 3 things are close to an offer, why would they start now?

Here's another variation on answering that question.

I don't know if this happened 4 years ago or 4 weeks ago. If it is 4 years ago, they may have some notes, especially for speaking to the same person as you did, then about the turndown that you gave them, and then go into the explanation for why you chose that firm over there firm. If it is 4 months ago, the 1st answer that I gave applies.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Yoga for Job Hunters | Job Search Radio

EP 304 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what he calls the yoga of job hunting.

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If you stay in your comfort zone talking to the same people over and over again, applying to the same jobs you find online over and over again, you are going to wind up in a small confined area. Instead, you want to be thinking like yoga, which is about the stretch and doing slightly more all the time in order to grow your muscle, become more limber and feel better.

Too often, we as adults (I include you millennials) start to think in terms of the rules you have been taught and systems that you have been taught to believe in that, frankly, are just self-limiting beliefs that others are imposing upon you.

As a guest of mine on Job Search Radio said a while back (his name is Chance Taureau), we are the product of all of our habits. If our habit is to second-guess ourselves and to work in small confined areas, we are constantly going to be having doubt and second-guessing ourselves. What you want to be doing is constantly going to the stretch. I'm not going to be stretching out for you now; I did that earlier today. I'll simply say that what's important is to stretch a little bit, to get to that place where you go a little bit more every day and discover that you can do more.

I remember going to a yoga class some years ago and the teacher said, "STRETCH all the way possible." That was great. Then they said, "STRETCH a little bit further." Remember, with stretch all the way possible and lo and behold we were able to go further. It's the same way with job hunting. It's the same way with networking.

When all is said and done, your self-limiting beliefs are what is probably holding you back from reaching out and connecting with that person that you really admire or can really help you. It's time to change the behavior and stretch just a little bit more every single day in order to get what you want..

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.
 
If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

I Was Low Balled on an Offer! | Job Search Radio

EP 303 him Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a viewer’s question about a tough salary negotiation where he was low-balled by a firm he received an offer from and hen received a counteroffer from his current employer.

If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017

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I'm going to paraphrase the scenario for you, but just follow with me, okay? This person is an offer from a quality organization that he would really like to work for. However, they lowballed him. The hiring manager went the bat, saying that lowballing him was the wrong strategy; he is worth more. Regardless, HR has lowballed him.

With some trepidation, he decided to give notice. It is the middle the month as I am recording this. He is given 2 weeks notice and it would be starting at the beginning of the month with this well-regarded organization in this job that you prefer doing.

He gives his notice, having been a consultant for this 1 firm for a long time. They have been dangling a carrot in front of him and now that he is given notice, suddenly they go, "Wait! No no no no no no no no no! DON'T GO! WE WILL GIVE IT TO YOU NOW!" He has a dilemma. What do you do?

The negotiation is completely botched so let's acknowledge that. It should have been done differently and I will simply say he has some leverage on both sides. This is the way that I would play it.

He's not sure if his current firm will give them a promotion. I also know he really would prefer the other position more (the one with the celebrity firm), but, you know, there are always other fish in the sea.

You start off by determining from the current firm what they are really going to do for him. Let's start off with the position that he really wants and a raise to minimally manage that which he has given notice for. OR, if it is less money than what he is currently making,. He is getting a promotion, and more money should come with a promotion, right?

Even if they don't commit to the promotion and they just commit to a full-time job, ask them to put the offer letter in writing so that he has that as an indication of their good intentions.

Next, with the other firm, once he has this, he can go back to the celebrity firm and say," I gave notice and received a counter offer. I would frankly rather join your firm. However, let's get practical. All along I have said that I am likely to get a counter. You have lowballed me and guess what happened? I got a counter. I would rather join your firm. The hiring manager tells me that he went to you and told you not to do this but you did it anyway. But, regardless, I would like to join. This is the number that will cause me to join."

The 1st thing I would do actually is called the hiring manager before calling HR and tell them that you have another offer as a counter just as you would warned. " You know, I am not independently wealthy.. You won't see my name in the Forbes list of wealthiest Americans. I want to join your firm and I would like to work for you. I can't walk away from so much money and this role which is an interesting role. Can you get me more?"

Have him or her go to bat for you with HR. Have them call the big medium blowup the situation and force HR to do what they should've done all along. Some major organizations do this; they lowball and try to save some money. They act as though it is coming out of their pocket. But, at the end of the day, there are other firms that you can join.

Recognize that! This is a market where you have choices. Don't allow yourself to be bludgeoned based upon the old scenario of a year ago and beyond! Use your leverage well here.

The celebrity firm, the well-known firm, will up the offer or they are going to walk away and then the hiring manager is going to blow a fit. That doesn't help you. The real question is you can only do this if you would really accept the current situation. If you won't or can't, then you are stuck because you have no leverage. You don't really want to walk away.

If you are prepared to walk away, this is the best way to play it. Get the current offer,See if they will up the money a little bit when they do it. Then circle back to the celebrity firm's hiring manager and tell them what's happened and say, "Look, I want to join. You know what I am worth. However, HR has a bug up your butt about lowballing me. I don't know why. Do you?' Have he or she go to bat for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

 

Letting Them Know How Committed You Are | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a viewer about letting a firm know how committed he or she should be to them.

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Let me just read the question to you before I answer it. "After applying to a job with only one other applicant, as a non-citizen, how can I contact the hiring manager to let them know how committed I would be."

There are 2 dimensions to this. What is about the contact and the other is about being a non-citizen. I'm going to respond in 2 layers. The 1st 1 is that they know you're in the United States on H1B visa. You have already had an interview and now want to contact the hiring manager. I would suggest sending an email. You might call it the firm. If you don't have the correct email address, ask for the hiring manager's email address and, if they are unwilling to give it to you, tell reception that you interviewed with so and so and want to get their email address to send a thank you note. It's really simple.

The note basically says, "Thanks for making time to meet with me. I really enjoyed speaking with you. I think the opportunity would be a terrific one for me." Then talk about your qualifications for the role. Then conclude in the last paragraph by saying, "in case there is any doubt, I just want to know how committed I would be to this role and to the organization. I look forward to hearing from you about next steps in the process." Again, it is very simple.

Now, let's assume that you don't have an interview. You've just been to a job board or website where they clock the number of responses so that you know there are only 2 people who have responded. You and one other person, and they don't know that you are working on a visa or let's assume that they do a you just haven't gotten a response yet.

You basically do the same thing-- get an email address for this person. Don't know who this person is?: Perception and say, "I understand that there is a position open for such and such. Who is the hiring manager for that?" They will try to send you to HR. Politely accept the transfer and, from there, talk the phone call and then call back a little while later, as for the name of the CIO, call their office, ask for the name of the hiring manager who is responsible for that position or that function and do much the same thing.

You send them an email letting them know of your qualifications and indicating that you responded directly for the position that you want to talk with them about the role and about your background. Talk about how your experience fits, just like I explained in the previous one and then conclude by saying, "I haven't heard from anyone about my candidacy yet. I just want to simply say that this role looks terrific. I have a background where I could deliver for you and I would work very hard for you." Write it in a way that demonstrates your commitment to the organization and to the position just like in the last example I gave.

Try not to be too polite. 1 of the things that's culturally different about US society and US culture in business as compared to others is that if you are too polite, it is not received well. You can be cordial without being obsequious, slave like, demonstrating extreme obedience. American culture doesn't really respect that.

Again, 2 ways to respond to that. I hope you find this helpful. I have many more answers to questions on YouTube. Look for Ask The Big Game Hunter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook. Like Job Search Radio on Facebook, too.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

If you are a listener who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​ and put the words Job Search Radio in the subject line. A 30 minute session with me will only be $99 for May, 2017